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German G7 Presidency 2022

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Labour

Overview: Labour

Labour market policy

Basic income support for jobseekers

Skilled workers

Transformation of the world of work

Labour Law

Occupational Safety and Health

Social Affairs

Overview: Social Affairs

Social Insurance

Statutory accident insurance

Old-age security in Germany

Social Assistance

Socialcompensation law

Health Care

Participation and inclusion

Europe and the World

Overview: Europe and the World

Europe

Overview: Europe

Employment and social policy in the EU

Working in another EU country

EU external relations

Migration from third countries

European Funds

Overview: Europeean Funds

European Social Fund (ESF)

European Globalisation Fund (EGF)

Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD)

International

Overview: International

International Employment and Social Policy

Labour and Social Policy at the G7/G20 Levels

German G7 Presidency 2022

Corporate Social Responsibility

Twinning in Labour and Social Policy (Administrative partnerships)

Bilateral social security agreements outside the European Union

International Organisations

Services

Overview:  Services

Contact

Publications

Overview: Publications

Shopping cart

Press

Overview: Press

Recent Publications

Press photos

Overview: Press photos

Press photos of the minister

Press photos of the state secretaries

RSS

The Ministry

Overview: The Ministry

BMAS at a Glance

Political Staff

Visitor Centre

International

Preparing for crises and mitigating consequences

Climate change and its effects are among the most pressing challenges that our societies will have to deal with in the next years and decades. The transition to a green economy is a necessity. At the same time, we need policies to guarantee social justice and inclusion in this transition. Only if we include all social groups and leave no one behind will we achieve acceptance in society and stronger societal cohesion.

When implementing the necessary climate action measures, responsible climate policy takes the social aspect into account and provides a balance where disproportionately high burdens are placed on certain population groups.

As leading industrialised nations, we as the G7 have the responsibility and the ability to be pioneers. We can lay the necessary foundations for the following:

  • ensuring social justice in the measures to combat climate change,
  • bolstering social protection systems and making them resilient enough to face extreme situations in the future; and
  • promoting universal access to social protection systems around the world.

Policies for social justice in the face of climate change

The efforts needed to restructure our societies in the face of climate change require far-reaching climate action policy in all areas. However, the social and distributional impact of these measures may place a disproportionate burden on parts of our societies if the policies do not take social justice into account. For example, rising energy prices hit low-income households particularly hard.

Providing support where it is needed

Responsible climate policy that compensates for social impact should incorporate the polluter pays principle. People and regions affected by extreme weather or structural change require active, effective support at an early stage. This principle is especially important given that low-income households cause significantly less CO2 than households with higher incomes.

Oxfam Download image A detailed and complete description of the graphic can be found under this link

Infographic on social protection with the title: "Worldwide CO2 emissions by income in the period 1990 to 2015".

The world's highest-income households are responsible for 52% of CO2 emissions. Of total emissions, 15% is accounted for by the richest 1% of the population. Thirty-seven percent of emissions come from the richest 10%. The middle 40% are responsible for 41% of the emissions. By contrast, the world’s poorest 50% are responsible for only 7% of total CO2 emissions. The per capita annual income threshold for the richest 1% is $109,000; the richest 10%, $38,000; the middle 40%, $6,000; and the poorest 50%, below $6,000.

Our energy policy will also change because of Russia’s aggression and its military invasion of Ukraine and the resulting sanctions. This will lead to further increases in energy prices. The price increases due to climate action therefore come on top of the price increases due to the reorientation of energy procurement.

Answers to pressing questions

As leading industrialised nations, the G7 have a responsibility to have balanced climate action policies.  We are committed to seeing this in conjunction with social policy. Climate action is always about protecting the weakest members of society.

The exception will become the rule

We can assume that extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and severe storms will increase in both intensity and frequency in the coming years. The so-called “floods of the century” of the Elbe and the Ahr valley have shown that even Germany will not be spared from the effects.

CRED; UNDRR Download image A detailed and complete description of the graphic can be found under this link

Infographic on social protection with the title: "Number of natural disasters worldwide from 1980 to 1999 and from 2000 to 2019".

The infographic compares the frequency of different types of natural disasters worldwide from 1980 to 1999 and from 2000 to 2019. The figures were in comparison much higher in the 19 years between 2000 and 2019 than in the 19 years between 1980 and 1999 for floods and storms in particular. This can be seen for storms, earthquakes, extreme temperatures, landslides, droughts, wildfires and volcanic eruptions. Only the number of dry landslides and rockfalls are declining.

Better preparation for extreme events

Crises and disasters pose enormous challenges for the labour market and social protection systems as a whole. Social protection systems that can adapt can contribute to resilience. During crises, they have a particularly important role in mitigating the socio-economic impact. As the G7, we want to take a fresh look at social protection systems. For example, we want to integrate the lessons learned from the global COVID 19 pandemic, to exchange ideas on existing labour market and social policy measures in crises and disasters, and to identify possible best practices to increase the resilience of social protection systems.

Universal access to social protection systems

Social protection systems contribute significantly to decent work and sustainable development. The "right of everyone to social security, including social insurance" is a human right enshrined in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
 of the United Nations.

As the G7, we want to do more to achieve the goals of the 2030 Agenda, in particular Goal 1.3. “Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable”.

More than four billion people still lack any social protection, according to data from the International Labour Organization.

As leading industrialised nations, we have a special moral responsibility to work towards better social protection for all people, because it is essential to saving many people from poverty. We therefore want to focus more on this important issue in the framework of G7. This includes aiming to agree on possible policies and measures advocating for more social protection worldwide.

Further Information

International